Archive | SFF RSS feed for this section

I was on the radio :O

8 Jul

So I was on the radio today! At 2 pm (GMT+8) on BFM. You probably missed it — I did — but you can download the podcast, or just listen to it online:

Bookmark: Sci-Fi in Print, with Umapagan Ampikaipakan and Zen Cho

“Sci-Fi in Print” is like the most non-SF description of anything ever, haha. It’s because sci-fi is movies, is it? So you have to specify that it’s in print? Something like that lah. Anyway, click for 20 minutes of me mumbling nervously about Penguin Popular Classics! I also talk about how I see a direct line between all the 19th century British literature I used to read and the speculative fiction genre my stories have ended up inhabiting. (19th century Britain, outer space and Middle-earth were/are equally alien and fantastical to me. I know Middle-earth is a bad example given it basically is 19th century Britain, but I can’t think of any other fantasy secondary worlds at the moment that I cared about that weren’t Britain in some form!)

One of the things Uma asked me that made me a bit thoughtful was why there wasn’t more SF in the book. I sort of skirted around the question, but the honest answer is that I am just scared of it. I feel like I’m not smart enough to write SF. A difficult admission to make on radio! There is a lot of SF out there that has very little to do with actual science, so I am conscious that it’s a slightly silly thing to think, but it’s one of the things I’m working through.

Here is another cool thing:

MPH Bestsellers

You probably don’t have to sell a whole lot of copies to be top 20 in MPH — but I’ll take it!

My draft WorldCon 2014 programme

4 Jul

Draft programme schedules for Loncon 3 were sent out a while ago. My schedule’s below! I will be on six panels, and am really excited about all of them. I have to say, it looks like the Loncon 3 programming team have done a great job — my Twitter feed was full of glee when people were getting their panel assignments.

My (long, rambly) comments are in italics below.

 

The Deeper the Roots, the Stronger the Tree

Friday 10:00 – 11:00

The roots of modern science fiction and fantasy are often associated with authors such as J.R.R. Tolkien, T.H. White, H.G. Wells, and Mary Shelley. But plenty of 19th- and early 20th-century authors with minimal or no fantastical or sfnal content have inspired and continue to inspire modern genre writing, including but not limited to Alexandre Dumas, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jane Austen, and Georgette Heyer. What is the on-going appeal of such authors, their styles, and their worlds? What is it about them that lends itself to genrefication?

Abigail Sutherland (M), Zen Cho, Mary Robinette Kowal, Adam Roberts, Kari Sperring

I am SO PUMPED for this panel, you guys, you don’t even know. I feel it’s particularly perfect for meee because I’ve always felt a bit of an imposter in SFF fandom — although the SFnal sensibility and mindset and community have a lot of appeal for me, and I suppose I do feel that I’m on the same wavelength with a lot of SFF fans, I can easily go several months without reading any SFF. But with this I feel like — I can be at a SF con and talk about the 19th century (and pseudo-19th century) authors I grew up reading and it is totally legit! Maybe I do belong in SF fandom after all.

 

Manga Evolutions

Friday 12:00 – 13:30

Manga developed in Japan as a syncretic reaction to American comic books from an indigenous art perspective, to become a unique style of sequential art.

Manga has since emerged from Japan to become a vibrant style adopted by creators in other countries.

What are the more interesting and existing transformations that Manga has undergone in Japan, and outside its birthplace? What is the future of Manga as an art expression in the 21st century?

Zen Cho (M), June Madeley, Sarah Ash, Emmeline Pui Ling Dobson, Eric Senabre

This is the one where I was like, “What, I don’t know anything about this!” But then I realised I am only going to be the moderator and calmed down. I’m really looking forward to hearing the discussion. Must prep good questions! What would YOU ask, gentle reader? <– laziness crowdsourcing

 

Cities: Where, Who, Why?

Friday 18:00 – 19:00

Some cities — London being one — are well established as venues for stories, and SF and fantasy stories in particular. How do individual stories and personal experiences — insider and outsider views, those who have made a city their home and those who have migrated to it — interact to create the literary city? What power dynamics affect this process and what does that mean for our imagining of cities? Why do some cities rather than others develop this sort of literary aura — and which cities might we expect to see more of in the future?

Michael R. Underwood (M), Lauren Beukes, Zen Cho, Ian McDonald, Yen Ooi , Sarah Shemilt

This is a subject that interests me a lot, as it must interest any (post-)colonial reader who was nurtured on stories of cities they’d never seen but (in some senses) knew better than their own. I should finish Five Star Billionaire and then I can say that the next cities we’ll see are Shanghai and Beijing and the like.

 

The World at Worldcon: SF/F in South and South-East Asia

Saturday 13:30 – 15:00

South and South-East Asia include a huge span of nations, cultures and languages, so does it make any sense to talk of “Asian SF”? What are the traditions and touchstones of fantastical storytelling in South and South-East Asia? What is the state of genre there, and how have shared myths and a joint heritage of colonialism influenced it? A panel of writers and critics from India, Pakistan, Malaysia and The Philippines compare notes.

Mahvesh Murad (M), Zen Cho, Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, Victor Fernando R. Ocampo, Aishwarya Subramanian

We tweaked the original panel description to try to reduce the risk of the panel turning into each of us rolling out lists of genre authors from our respective countries. I am especially interested in talking about shared myths and the influence of colonialism — can we say that there is sufficient commonality because of those things, that we can sensibly talk of South and Southeast Asian SF as a Thing? But we’ll see where the discussion goes.

I am particularly excited that not even every Southeast Asian SF writer/fan who is going to be at Loncon is on this panel. There will be some left over to be in the audience, or not to attend at all! Maybe we should have dinner or something. (Asians attending Loncon 3: do you want to have dinner? Email me!)

 

The Education and Training of a Young Protagonist

Saturday 19:00 – 20:00

Kids have to go to school, whether it’s a modern day educational institution or the school of hard knocks in a futuristic dystopia. How is education treated in SF? What might a futuristic classroom look like? What are some great examples of how education and training have been used by other authors?

Zen Cho, Gail Carriger, Jack Campbell, Dave Luckett, Frances Hardinge

SCHOOL STORIES!!!! Huh, I hadn’t noticed that my name comes first but there is no (M).

Also I am going to be on a panel with Frances Hardinge. Here is what I will do for the duration of the panel: *_______________* But not in a creepy way!

 

Representation and Whitewashing in Fandom

Sunday 12:00 – 13:30

Fandoms can provide positive spaces for engagement with and education about representating people of colour, the campaign group “racebending” is a good example of this. Movies and television shows like Sleepy Hollow, Pacific Rim, and Marvel: Agents of SHIELD receive strong (but not universal) support, with fans pushing diversity by overtly supporting and praising the characters of colour. Fandoms become campaign groups. Yet, at the same time, many fandoms whitewash or relegate characters of colour in their fan works. More damagingly many fans react negatively to criticism of racism within their fandom and within the television shows, movies, and books they enjoy. In this session we explore the ups and downs of representation in fandom.

Bertha Chin (M), Zen Cho, Mark Oshiro, Anushia Kandasivam, Eylul Dogruel

The main thing I’m excited about with this panel is the chance to talk about fandom as a community and space which is different from SFF book fandom. (I think SFF book fandom is what most of my other panels are about/are grounded in — even the manga panel doesn’t read to me like a manga fandom panel in the way that, e.g., making fan soundtracks is a manga fandom activity. If that makes any sense outside my head!)

 

So yes! If you’ve ordered SPIRITS ABROAD from me, coming to one of my panels is probably a good way to see me and get your book, but even if you don’t I’ll hunt you down somehow. I do hope to spend some considerable amount of time at lobbycon or barcon. The downtime is my favourite part of a con.

SPIRITS ABROAD is out!

30 Jun

Me signing my book

The book is out! I’ve done a book launch! And now I have three brown paper parcels’ worth of books to sell and give away.

Spirits Abroad

How to get the book

I’ve set up a new page on my website with information about how you can order/pre-order the paperback: How to buy SPIRITS ABROAD. It’s very easy if you’re in Malaysia — MPH branches mostly seem to have it, so should other bookshops, and you can of course order it directly from Fixi. It’s slightly more complicated if you’re outside Malaysia, but you can pre-order it from Amazon.com (it’s not available on the other Amazons, as far as I know).

I’ll also be putting out an ebook later this year, with various extras. You may want to wait for that! If you do buy the paperback, though, hang on to your proof of payment — I’ll be offering a discount on the ebook price to people who bought the paperback.

Attending Nine Worlds or WorldCon this year?

If you’re coming to Nine Worlds Geekfest 2014 or Loncon 3 this August, you can get the book at either con!

Nine Worlds: The book will be available in the dealers’ room. I’ll probably have a couple of copies on me as well if you happen to run into me at the con.

Loncon 3: Unless someone offers me space on a vendor’s table (which, that would be very welcome!) you’ll have to get ahold of me to get ahold of the book.

If you would like to get the book at these cons, what would be really helpful for me is if you could reserve a copy by completing the fields below and paying in advance. That’ll enable me to put aside a book for you, as I only have limited copies of the paperback. Reserve your copy below the cut!

[...]

SPIRITS ABROAD – Cover reveal

13 Jun

So if you follow me on Twitter or Facebook (or worst of all, BOTH), you will have seen this plenty of times, but I am super excited about it and will not rest till I have posted it on every Internet outlet possible. I may start printing it off and sticking it to lamp-posts.

For lo! I have a cover!

SPIRITS ABROAD cover - woman's face with eyes shut and a frangipani in the middle of her forehead

Back copy

“If you live near the jungle, you will realise that what is real and what is not real is not always clear. In the forest there is not a big gap between the two.”

A Datin recalls her romance with an orang bunian. A teenage pontianak struggles to balance homework, bossy aunties, first love, and eating people. An earth spirit gets entangled in protracted negotiations with an annoying landlord, and Chang E spins off into outer space, the ultimate metaphor for the Chinese diaspora.

Straddling the worlds of the mundane and the magical, SPIRITS ABROAD collects 10 science fiction and fantasy stories with a distinctively Malaysian sensibility.

Launch

The book will be out in a week’s time (!) from Fixi Novo, an imprint of Buku Fixi, an indie press I’ve been following with great interest since it was started up by the confusingly multi-talented Amir Muhammad. Fixi has taken off in a huge way since its early days, and I am thrilled to be published with them.

As I mentioned in my previous post, the launch will be at Whitebox @ Publika, starting at 5 pm on Saturday 21st: the Facebook event has more details. Fellow Malaysian SF author Ee Leen Lee will also be launching her book, 13 MOONS. It should be good! Do come if you are in KL. (Must BYO spirits, though.)

How you can get ahold of the book

Because a couple of people asked — the paperback will be available for purchase on Amazon US if you’re outside Malaysia. I’ll put up a link when it’s up. I’ll also be selling/giving away a few once I get ahold of my author copies, and I’ll be happy to ship those anywhere in the world.

Plus, I’m planning to release an ebook version soon, which will probably have extra stories. \o/ I’d also like to include other extras, though I can’t think of anything just this minute. What sort of extras would you like to see? Maybe I’ll do a “DVD commentary” (do people still do these for fic?), or an interview or something. (I will interview … MYSELF)

Anyway! I don’t expect to shift that many copies of the ebook, but I just want to make sure any readers outside Malaysia can get ahold of the book easily if they want it (and TBH, to the extent that I have readers, the overwhelming majority of them are outside Malaysia). If you’re inside Malaysia, though, it’ll be super easy to get — order from the website (not yet la, after launch only can), or in stores.

Full Table of Contents below the cut!

[...]

Grants, aunts and mammoths

5 May

Catching up on some news:

 

Speculative Literature Foundation Writing Grants

I’ll be helping to judge the SLF’s new Diverse Writers and Diverse Worlds Grants! These are grants of US$500 each for writers who are working on books (novels or short story collections) in the speculative fiction genre. The Diverse Writers grant is for writers from traditionally underrepresented/marginalised backgrounds, and the Diverse Worlds grant is for work that presents diverse worlds well, regardless of the writer’s background.

If this sounds like it might be relevant to your interests, have a look at the guidelines and send in your WIPs for fun and (potential) profit! The deadline for applications is 31 July.

 

The House of Aunts on stage

The Stanford Asian American Theatre Project is putting on a theatrical adaptation of my story THE HOUSE OF AUNTS. I have had nothing to do with it whatever — I mean, apart from saying “Sure!” when I was asked if they could do it — and it is pretty cool to see the story wandering around the world on its own legs. The Facebook event page has details of the show if you are in Stanford this week and want to check it out: AATP Presents THE HOUSE OF AUNTS.

There’s also an amusing trailer here (links to Facebook, but I don’t think you have to be logged in to see it): Trailer for THE HOUSE OF AUNTS.

 

The Mammoth Book of SF Stories by Women

I am very pleased to have a story in the upcoming anthology The Mammoth Book of SF Stories by Women, edited by Alex Dally MacFarlane. It’s a reprint of my story THE FOUR GENERATIONS OF CHANG E, about the Moon Goddess Chang E as the ultimate overseas outer space Chinese.

Kristin Mandigma’s hilarious aswang story is also in the anthology! That’s enough to show it’s a good Table of Contents, but if you want to see the full line-up, have a look at the SF Signal announcement. (The cover is also very cool!)

 

So that’s all pretty cool! In terms of actual writing, I am plugging away at the novel revision, and hoping to have that wrapped up in a couple of months so I can have a bit of time to write a couple of short stories. I haven’t written a short story in super long lor. I also have plans for self-publishing and whatnot, but all must await the pleasure of the novel!

Links are interested in Southeast Asian literature

9 Feb

Calls for submissions

Poskod.MY are running a writing programme focusing on Kuala Lumpur’s untold stories: UnRepresented. They are looking for “writers who would like to spend ten weeks exploring themes of ‘being unrepresented’ and unrepresented narratives in and around KL“. The programme will consist of workshops and talks in eight weekend sessions held in March-May 2014. It sounds super interesting — if you are in the right country and up for it, you should totally apply! Deadline 19 February.

 

THE SEA IS OURS is a Southeast Asian steampunk anthology seeking short story submissions.

How does the steampunk aesthetic look, feel, sound, smell, or taste like in these regions? What kind of technologies would grow in resource-rich SEAsia? What do our historical figures, our Parameswaras, Trung sisters, Lapu-Lapus, do in such a world?

The anthology is edited by Jaymee Goh and Joyce Ch’ng, and will be put out by Rosarium Publishing, who did the book MOTHERSHIP: TALES OF AFROFUTURISM AND BEYOND (among others). Deadline 30 June.

 

Seen on the Readings Facebook group, a call for submissions of Malaysian poetry in English. Text reproduced below for non-Facebook users:

Prof Ghulam‘s message for all Msian poets writing in English:

I am working towards a new anthology of Malaysian poetry in English.

Hopefully this will provide the opportunity to new and not so new authors to get their work into print. I hope to collect around 80 poems by as many authors as possible by the end of March and the book published by the end of June. I will be happy to welcome poems from you or from others you know. Kindly pass the word around.

Pls email him directly at gsyousof@hotmail.com.

 

Help for playwrights

Also seen on Facebook, Singaporean playwright Alfian Sa’at makes an open offer, which I reproduce including emoticons:

If you have a play that deals with ethnic minority experiences in Singapore and need some help with it, please send it to me. I’m offering free one-on-one consultation for it. In English or Malay. PM me please! :)

 

Events

There is going to be a literary festival in Alor Setar in March! Find out more at the website: Alor Setar Literary Festival. They have missed their golden chance to hip-ify the name and call it “A.Star” or something like that, but otherwise it looks pretty cool!

(I am linking in part because (guilty confession) Alor Setar has always been in my mind a symbol for the boring one-horse town. I have never even really seen the town so it is a totally unfair, baseless judgment. I trace it to something my dad once said when we were visiting Edinburgh. Now, I like Edinburgh — a storied, beautiful city, bracingly hard on the calves — but my dad stood in the middle of Princes Street, looked up and down, and said, in the most unimpressed way anyone ever said anything: “One main street only. Like Alor Setar like that!”)

 

And an article

I found Mohammad A. Quayum’s article on English-language literature in Malaysia and Singapore interesting. He posits that Malaysian writing in English is thin on the ground and of variable quality because of politics around the national language and what counts as “national literature”. I really don’t know enough about the subject to comment, but will look forward to the continuation!

A quick and dirty guide to selling SFF short stories

13 Jan

I am doing a sort of information sharing meme at my Dreamwidth journal, and am cross-posting a revised version of one of my comments in the event that it might be useful. It is a quick and dirty guide to selling SFF short stories!

(We will consider and dismiss a spasm of Imposter Syndrome here about how it is rich for me to be telling other people how to sell SFF short stories when it’s not like I’ve ever been published in x, y or z pro markets.)

These are basic practical tips for people who are not sure where to start. It assumes that you are already writing or planning to write short stories that are speculative in nature. No actual writing advice is given.

The main plank of my approach is this: what you want to do is mechanise your submission process, so that you continue submitting lots without its disturbing your peace of mind, preserving the mental space you need to write.

(1) Make a list of markets. I like Duotrope, which is a search engine that lets you search by word count, genre, etc. It’s paid now, but there’s a free trial. Ralan is the other main resource. ETA: via Kara Lee, The Grinder is a Duotrope alternative that is free and looks like it does some of #5 for you.

Depending on your area of interest, you may also want to look at Asia Writes (which is also on Twitter) and this helpful list of explicitly diversity-friendly SFF markets. You can also look at the websites/bibliographies of authors who write stories like yours, and google the markets they have published in.

But you’ll want to compile your own list, to match what you’re most likely to be sending out. My list of markets recorded:

  • Genre
  • Word count
  • Pay rate
  • What editors said about what they wanted or didn’t want to see, and/or any other specific information e.g. peculiar formatting requirements

When submitting, you want to go for markets that pay you (pro, semi-pro and token, in that order) and, ideally, the ones that make stories available for free online. The latter is because exposure is the most important thing for a new writer. You can’t link to stories in anthologies.

(Of course, there are lots of nice things about publishing in anthologies — interesting themes; contributor copies; being in books in actual bookshops; and that glow of excitement when you see the Table of Contents and realise that your story is in the same book as a story by an admired author. *_*)

[...]

The annual awards eligibility post, plus other things

6 Jan

I really didn’t want to make this post this year, which probably means I should. >_< But first, links to other people’s posts!

Aliette de Bodard has done her usual round-up including excellent Asian SFF by other people as well herself. Check out her links and download a free novelette at her post: Awards eligibility and awards recommendations.

Ken Liu has also got a fabulously comprehensive post linking to his favourite (mostly short) fiction of the year, plus his own eligible work (which includes two stories about litigators!): Nominating Stories for Awards.

Short stories I’ve had published this year:

Love in the Time of Utopia in Issue #1 of LONTAR, ed. Jason Erik Lundberg and Kristine Ong Muslim, Math Paper Press (September 2013). 6,200 words.

“You’re missing out. At least love is available to everybody, high station or low. It’s the one thing you can get without having to sit exam.”

The Fish Bowl in The Alchemy Press Book of Urban Mythic, ed. Jan Edwards and Jenny Barber, Alchemy Press (November 2013). 5,600 words.

The koi’s mouth opened and closed, an intermittent surprised O. Its white skin was so smooth it seemed scaleless. It would feel like silken tofu if you touched it. Seen from above, the fish’s one eye looked heavy-lidded and wise.

“Are you a magical fish or a door-to-door salesman?” Su Yin whispered.

Balik Kampung (Going Back) in End of the Road, ed. Jonathan Oliver, Solaris Books (December 2013). 4,700 words.

Hungry ghosts were the spirits of the unfortunate, unlamented dead: those who were killed violently; who died burdened by unfulfilled longings; who had been greedy or ungenerous in life; who were forgotten by their living. It was obvious to Lydia which category she fell into.

These are all eligible in the short story category, and I’d be happy to provide copies to anyone who’d like to read them for awards — just comment with your email address, or email me. No obligation to nominate after reading, obviously!

(There were two more — Jebat Dies in Esquire Malaysia and Double-Blind in Fixi Novo’s Love in Penang (ed. Anna Tan) — but the first is Hang Tuah fanfic and the second is a totally non-speculative love story, so they don’t really count for these purposes.)

If you have had things published that are eligible, and you are dithering over whether to make this sort of post or not — do it. Do it even if you don’t think anyone reads your blog or follows your Twitter account who even votes for this kind of thing. Do it even if making the post makes you cringe. My blog doesn’t get a lot of pageviews, but I am absolutely certain that I wouldn’t have got the Campbell nomination if I hadn’t made this post last year.

***

I am going to piggyback off this post to post about two more things!

For some reason Fixi always gotta publish all its calls for submissions in pictorial form. Their English-language imprint is now seeking short stories and creative non-fiction of 2,000-5,000 words for a new anthology called Lost in Putrajaya. Deadline 28 February. See the call for submissions here.

If I were a better and braver writer I would venture out of my comfort zone and write hardbitten crime stories and political satire to submit to Fixi’s English-language anthologies. Sadly I am a wimp + lazy, so I don’t! You should do it for me.

Also, if you go to Google.com.my today, it has a picture of beloved filmmaker Yasmin Ahmad which makes me all misty-eyed — like her work itself. She would’ve been 56 years old today (going by Malaysian time la). Faster go! The art is lovely.