My draft WorldCon 2014 programme

4 Jul

Draft programme schedules for Loncon 3 were sent out a while ago. My schedule’s below! I will be on six panels, and am really excited about all of them. I have to say, it looks like the Loncon 3 programming team have done a great job — my Twitter feed was full of glee when people were getting their panel assignments.

My (long, rambly) comments are in italics below.

 

The Deeper the Roots, the Stronger the Tree

Friday 10:00 – 11:00

The roots of modern science fiction and fantasy are often associated with authors such as J.R.R. Tolkien, T.H. White, H.G. Wells, and Mary Shelley. But plenty of 19th- and early 20th-century authors with minimal or no fantastical or sfnal content have inspired and continue to inspire modern genre writing, including but not limited to Alexandre Dumas, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jane Austen, and Georgette Heyer. What is the on-going appeal of such authors, their styles, and their worlds? What is it about them that lends itself to genrefication?

Abigail Sutherland (M), Zen Cho, Mary Robinette Kowal, Adam Roberts, Kari Sperring

I am SO PUMPED for this panel, you guys, you don’t even know. I feel it’s particularly perfect for meee because I’ve always felt a bit of an imposter in SFF fandom — although the SFnal sensibility and mindset and community have a lot of appeal for me, and I suppose I do feel that I’m on the same wavelength with a lot of SFF fans, I can easily go several months without reading any SFF. But with this I feel like — I can be at a SF con and talk about the 19th century (and pseudo-19th century) authors I grew up reading and it is totally legit! Maybe I do belong in SF fandom after all.

 

Manga Evolutions

Friday 12:00 – 13:30

Manga developed in Japan as a syncretic reaction to American comic books from an indigenous art perspective, to become a unique style of sequential art.

Manga has since emerged from Japan to become a vibrant style adopted by creators in other countries.

What are the more interesting and existing transformations that Manga has undergone in Japan, and outside its birthplace? What is the future of Manga as an art expression in the 21st century?

Zen Cho (M), June Madeley, Sarah Ash, Emmeline Pui Ling Dobson, Eric Senabre

This is the one where I was like, “What, I don’t know anything about this!” But then I realised I am only going to be the moderator and calmed down. I’m really looking forward to hearing the discussion. Must prep good questions! What would YOU ask, gentle reader? <– laziness crowdsourcing

 

Cities: Where, Who, Why?

Friday 18:00 – 19:00

Some cities — London being one — are well established as venues for stories, and SF and fantasy stories in particular. How do individual stories and personal experiences — insider and outsider views, those who have made a city their home and those who have migrated to it — interact to create the literary city? What power dynamics affect this process and what does that mean for our imagining of cities? Why do some cities rather than others develop this sort of literary aura — and which cities might we expect to see more of in the future?

Michael R. Underwood (M), Lauren Beukes, Zen Cho, Ian McDonald, Yen Ooi , Sarah Shemilt

This is a subject that interests me a lot, as it must interest any (post-)colonial reader who was nurtured on stories of cities they’d never seen but (in some senses) knew better than their own. I should finish Five Star Billionaire and then I can say that the next cities we’ll see are Shanghai and Beijing and the like.

 

The World at Worldcon: SF/F in South and South-East Asia

Saturday 13:30 – 15:00

South and South-East Asia include a huge span of nations, cultures and languages, so does it make any sense to talk of “Asian SF”? What are the traditions and touchstones of fantastical storytelling in South and South-East Asia? What is the state of genre there, and how have shared myths and a joint heritage of colonialism influenced it? A panel of writers and critics from India, Pakistan, Malaysia and The Philippines compare notes.

Mahvesh Murad (M), Zen Cho, Rochita Loenen-Ruiz, Victor Fernando R. Ocampo, Aishwarya Subramanian

We tweaked the original panel description to try to reduce the risk of the panel turning into each of us rolling out lists of genre authors from our respective countries. I am especially interested in talking about shared myths and the influence of colonialism — can we say that there is sufficient commonality because of those things, that we can sensibly talk of South and Southeast Asian SF as a Thing? But we’ll see where the discussion goes.

I am particularly excited that not even every Southeast Asian SF writer/fan who is going to be at Loncon is on this panel. There will be some left over to be in the audience, or not to attend at all! Maybe we should have dinner or something. (Asians attending Loncon 3: do you want to have dinner? Email me!)

 

The Education and Training of a Young Protagonist

Saturday 19:00 – 20:00

Kids have to go to school, whether it’s a modern day educational institution or the school of hard knocks in a futuristic dystopia. How is education treated in SF? What might a futuristic classroom look like? What are some great examples of how education and training have been used by other authors?

Zen Cho, Gail Carriger, Jack Campbell, Dave Luckett, Frances Hardinge

SCHOOL STORIES!!!! Huh, I hadn’t noticed that my name comes first but there is no (M).

Also I am going to be on a panel with Frances Hardinge. Here is what I will do for the duration of the panel: *_______________* But not in a creepy way!

 

Representation and Whitewashing in Fandom

Sunday 12:00 – 13:30

Fandoms can provide positive spaces for engagement with and education about representating people of colour, the campaign group “racebending” is a good example of this. Movies and television shows like Sleepy Hollow, Pacific Rim, and Marvel: Agents of SHIELD receive strong (but not universal) support, with fans pushing diversity by overtly supporting and praising the characters of colour. Fandoms become campaign groups. Yet, at the same time, many fandoms whitewash or relegate characters of colour in their fan works. More damagingly many fans react negatively to criticism of racism within their fandom and within the television shows, movies, and books they enjoy. In this session we explore the ups and downs of representation in fandom.

Bertha Chin (M), Zen Cho, Mark Oshiro, Anushia Kandasivam, Eylul Dogruel

The main thing I’m excited about with this panel is the chance to talk about fandom as a community and space which is different from SFF book fandom. (I think SFF book fandom is what most of my other panels are about/are grounded in — even the manga panel doesn’t read to me like a manga fandom panel in the way that, e.g., making fan soundtracks is a manga fandom activity. If that makes any sense outside my head!)

 

So yes! If you’ve ordered SPIRITS ABROAD from me, coming to one of my panels is probably a good way to see me and get your book, but even if you don’t I’ll hunt you down somehow. I do hope to spend some considerable amount of time at lobbycon or barcon. The downtime is my favourite part of a con.

Related posts

Trackbacks and Pingbacks

  1. What I’ll be doing at Nine Worlds | Zen Cho - July 25, 2014

    […] Culture track really. But I tempted her with school stories!) This is actually only one of two school stories panels I am on this summer, yay […]

  2. The Global Scifi Market | The Kingdoms of Evil - September 2, 2014

    […] Eastern Europe and the Baltic, Francophone countries, Spain, Israel, the Arab world, China, South and Southeast Asia, and Latin America. (I’d like to add more hyperlinks! Anyone else discussing these things? […]

Leave a Reply