Tag Archives: naomi novik

ARCs, giveaways, reviews, conversations

I’m sure the title of this post is terrible for SEO (search engine minimisation??) but it is going to be a grab-bag of things I’m catching up on. If you would like to get updates on writing stuff in REAL TIME, Twitter is generally my first port of call for reporting book news (I am zenaldehyde!) and I cross-post to Facebook as well nowadays, though the posts aren’t identical because Facebook permits me to be as verbose as I naturally am. I can be found here on Facebook: my profile is public so anyone can follow it, but if you’d like to be friended do drop me a message to let me know who you are.

On to the news!

Sorcerer to the Crown: galleys, giveaways and more!

Ace/Roc sent me galleys of the book! My gosh. It looks like a REAL BOOK. And it is covered with quotes by authors I admire hugely!

SorcererGalley

Naomi Novik! Ann Leckie! Courtney Milan! Karen Lord! Charles Stross! Kate Elliott (on the other side with the dragon, you can’t see it in this picture)!

And as of today, awardwinning YA author Justine Larbalestier, who says Sorcerer is:

Georgette Heyer meets Anthony Trollope with some Edward Said and a very big dash of feminism. Romance, magic, frocks, intrigue and lots of politics … I was in heaven. More please!

If you’re in the US, you can enter the Penguin BEA 2015 sweepstakes for a chance to win five new releases from Penguin Random House, which just might include Sorcerer to the Crown and/or Aliette de Bodard’s fabulous new novel The House of Shattered Wings. You don’t have to be at BEA to sign up — you just have to be resident in the States. (If you’re not in the US and want Aliette’s book, you can join the 500 people jostling for a free copy over at her own ARC giveaway!)

Otherwise, watch this space, because I am going to do a galley giveaway here soon. Subscribers to my mailing list will get a MAGICAL ADVANTAGE, so sign up now! It’s a new release mailing list so you don’t get regular news when you’re on it — I just send out an email when I’ve got new fiction out that you can read or order. Here’s a previous example.

The House of Aunts and Naomi Novik’s Uprooted

Speaking of writers I admire hugely, Naomi Novik wrote a really kind post about The House of Aunts on Tor.com:

A New Reality: The Optimism of Zen Cho

You feel as you read that the author wants you to be happy, even if she is not going to lie to you to make you feel more comfortable. … As a reader, when I feel a writer has those goals, it creates a kind of trust that carries me along with them. Even when they take me to difficult or uncomfortable or sad places, I still feel they are doing so because it’s where the story belongs, and even then still with the underlying desire to give satisfaction.

Naomi links this to fanfic writers and writing, and I thought it was interesting because it’s precisely this quality that I like in Naomi’s work. (This must sound like the most sickening logrolling! But long-term fandom friends will vouch for the fact that I was reading and squealing over Naomi’s stories since I was 16. (I actually went to look at the earliest story by her that I remember reading when it was being posted, and that was in 2000, so I was actually 14. 14 years old.))

I spent most of her newest book Uprooted with every part of me clenched in terror lest everything would not turn out OK, but I also simultaneously knew that everything would not only be OK but more than OK — marvellously, eucatastrophically more-than-OK. And the author saw me through, as I knew she would. You should read Uprooted.

Interviews and roundtables

The Star interviewed me, KL Noir: Yellow editor and Cyberpunk: Malaysia writer Kris Williamson, and romance author RodieR about the increasing popularity of genre fiction in Malaysia:

Is genre fiction picking up steam with Malaysian readers?

Our books are all finalists in the Popular-The Star Readers’ Choice Awards. Voting closes on 31 May so you still have a couple of days to vote for the winners!

And I spoke with Charles Tan, Aliette de Bodard, M Sereno, Bogi Takács and JY Yang for a roundtable on “diversity” and the kind of conversations we’d like to have for the Book Smugglers’ SFF in Conversation feature:

On Diversity

Actual fiction (kind of)

Finally, my new post went up at Where Ghost Words Dwell today! This is a group project I’m doing with a bunch of other cool SFF writers, where we string our discarded writing together on a blog, along with links and images. Today’s contribution is a piece of lost text from The House of Aunts:

At age 16, in Lubuk Udang

You can check out this explanation to get an idea of what the project is about, or better yet, read the whole blog through.

Early praise for SORCERER TO THE CROWN

I have been quietly bashing out a (very first draftish) first draft of the second book in the SORCERER ROYAL trilogy, but have put it aside briefly to work on copy-edits to SORCERER TO THE CROWN, which came in last week. It’s early days yet, but the book feels realer and realer!

We’re starting to get a couple of sightings in the wild. Earlier this week SORCERER TO THE CROWN showed up on the Barnes & Noble SFF Blog in a list of 5 Awesome Alternate Earth Stories Coming in 2015. And blurbs have been coming in for the book — check out these awesome things awesome people have said about SORCERER TO THE CROWN!

[box]”An enchanting cross between Georgette Heyer and Susannah Clarke, full of delights and surprises. Zen Cho unpins the edges of the canvas and throws them wide.”

–Naomi Novik, New York Times bestselling author of the Temeraire novels[/box]

[box]”A warm, funny debut novel by a brilliant new talent.”

–Charles Stross[/box]

[box]”Fabulous! If you like Austen or Patrick O’Brian, or magic and humor like Susanna Clarke, or simply a very fun read, you will really, really, enjoy this!”

–Ann Leckie, Hugo, Nebula, and Arthur C. Clarke Award winning author of Ancillary Justice[/box]

[box]”Zen Cho’s SORCERER TO THE CROWN is inventive, dangerous, brilliant, unsettling, and adorable, all at the same time.

It shatters as many rules as its characters do. Historical Britain will never be the same again, and I can’t wait for the next book.”

–Courtney Milan, New York Times and USA Today bestselling author[/box]

[box]”A deliciously true tale of politics and power in a charming, cruel world — it demands and deserves to be read again and again. Cho has humor and flair to match Pratchett and Heyer plus her own marvelous style.”

–Karen Lord, author of The Best of All Possible Worlds [/box]

[box]”A delightful and enchanting novel that uses sly wit and assured style to subvert expectations while it always, unfailingly, entertains. I loved it!”

–Kate Elliott, author of the Spiritwalker series[/box]

Also the fabulous Aliette de Bodard (whose book THE HOUSE OF SHATTERED WINGS is coming out with the same US publisher, at practically the same time! we are publishing buddies!) has left the first substantive review of the book on GoodReads. (Not, you know, that I object to GIF reviews. More GIFs for everyone, I say. With a soft g!) Aliette says it’s:

Magic, manners and dragons in Regency England–this alone would be awesome, but Zen Cho adds a veneer of comment on English colonial politics …. Like a mix of Jane Austen, PG Wodehouse, and Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, and all its own thing. Glorious.

\o/

The ineluctable greatness of dragons

troisroyaumes suggested I blog about dragons and why they are awesome!

Dragons are my favourite magical creature because they embody such a flexible concept. There are lots of different kinds in different cultures, so lots of satisfying variations. They can look like almost anything — they probably have scales, but they might have whiskers and horns or they might not. They might be long and serpentine, or stubby and lizard-like, or like an apatosaurus with wings. They can be really little (e.g. Sybil Vimes’s dragons in Guards! Guards!), or they can span skies or oceans. They often fly. They swim quite a lot. They frequently shapeshift, so they can turn into hot human beings where necessary. (Twilight with dragons instead of vampires??? EVERYTHING WITH DRAGONS INSTEAD OF VAMPIRES!)

Also they are neither necessarily evil or good. You get Pern dragons, who are basically like a powerful flying badass special friend who will always like you best forever. (Temeraire dragons are like a slightly less id-satisfying version of this. But only slightly less iddy!) You get traditional European dragons, who fly around laying waste to villages and devouring maidens. And of course, you get Chinese dragons, which control the weather and inhabit a level of awesomeness that sort of goes beyond good and evil.

I guess the enduring appeal of dragons for me lies in two things. One is the idea of an intelligent species that is not remotely human — so I take a pleasure in dragons that is quite like the pleasure I take in Star Trek aliens and their various cultural traditions. The other is the cultural specificity of the concept of a dragon — the cultural weight of it — which means that whenever you read or write about a dragon, that brings with it a whole weight of tradition and perception and narrative. Narratives, actually, since as discussed above dragons come in all kinds of shapes and forms and cultures. So there are all these interesting tropes to draw upon and play with, and if there is one thing I like in fiction it is playing with tropes.

Dragons are so great *_*